Road to the North 40

Hiking Mountain View Trail

Spending time at the North 40 is a bit bittersweet. We have this entire wonderful place and Phil still has to work and cannot enjoy it. He rode with me on the trip out and stayed here for 20 hours before flying out to go back to work. 🙁

So, as I walked the Mountain View Trail Loop today, all I could think about was that I wished he was here too. If anyone in the world deserves to enjoy the wide open beauty of Big Sky country, it is him.

Pictures below:

Blanket Flower, Blue Flax, and Pingue rubberweed (I think).

The last picture is the road leading to the North 40. Our house is the little brown house on the right.

Pingue rubberweed

Pingue Rubberweed

I am not sure I have this correctly identified. I is everywhere on the roadsides near White Sulphur Springs in Montana. The leaves don’t look exactly like the pictures I have found online but they are similar and no other flower I can find comes closer to the characteristics of this little clump of flowers.

Hikes/Walks where I photographed Pinque Rubberweed:

Road to the North 40

Hiking Mountain View Trail

Spending time at the North 40 is a bit bittersweet. We have this entire wonderful place and Phil still has to work and cannot enjoy it. He rode with me on the trip out and stayed here for 20 hours before flying out to go back to work. 🙁 So, as I walked the Mountain … Continue reading Hiking Mountain View Trail

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Bitterroot

June in Montana

Wildflower season in the Northern Rockies is in full bloom late May through June. This year, I got spent several weeks at our house during the peak of the flower season. I walked all over the property with my camera trying to make sure that I cataloged the species there.

A Few Notable Flowers I Found:

ARROWLEAF BALSAMROOT

This flower is scattered all over the North 40. I found it at the base of the Douglas firs as well as growing right out of the rocks. The leaf is fuzzy like lambs ears here in the east.

BITTERROOT

BitterrootBitterroot is the Montana State Flower!  It is small and grows low to the ground. It is actually a succulent. The bloom grows right up on a fleshy stem right out of the ground. There aren’t any “leaves” as such. The blooms were a pretty classic dark pink, though most pictures I’ve seen online are pale pink.

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

Hyacinth Triteleia grandiflora

See Wild Hyacinth

I found a few pictures online that have this flower classified in the hyacinth family. It could be misinformation, however.  I made the final specification based on the shape of the leaves and blooms.

We found them sparsely populating our property mainly in the more arid section.

Pasque Flower

Pasqueflower

Pasque Flower (or pasqueflower), wind flower, prairie crocus, Easter Flower, and meadow anemone.

See Pasque Flower

These little flowers look like a wild tulip. The insides are white with purple outer shells.  We found these growing in close proximity to the base of Douglas Fir trees. I don’t know if there is a symbiotic relationship or just coincidence.

Wild Phlox

Phlox (Woodland Phlox)

See Woodland Phlox

The blooms of Woodland Phlox make this easily identifiable. It grows in clumps all around our property with white, pink or purple blooms.

Phlox divaricata (wild blue phlox, woodland phlox, wild sweet william) is a species of flowering plant in the family Polemoniaceae, native to forests and fields in eastern North America.

Wild blue phlox is a semi-evergreen perennial growing 25–50 cm (10–20 in) tall with opposite, unstalked, hairy leaves 2.5–5 cm in length and ovate-lanceolate in shape. Flowers appear in early summer and are 2–4 cm in diameter, with five petals fused at the base into a thin tube.[2] The petals are a variety of pastel colors: blue-lavender, light purple, pink, or white.— Wikipedia